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Are we tanking yet? Sixers start key stretch of season against league’s creamy middle

Nov 27, 2013, 12:50 PM EDT

source:  As we speak, the Philadelphia 76ers sit at 6-9, with a nice long four-day break after their Saturday loss to the Indiana Pacers. The record isn’t very good in an objective sense, but it’s light years ahead of where most Sixers fans expected the team to be at this point in the year, and it’s good enough in the entirely underwhelming Eastern Conference that up until the Washington Wizards beat the Los Angeles Lakers last night to move to 6-8 on the season, they were still somehow in the playoff picture.

Needless to say, the middle is not where this team wants to be–the entire point of this season was supposed to be avoiding the middle. If Hinkie and company believed this team legitimately good enough to go for the top, perhaps we would, but far more hospitable to this team would be the very bottom, where of course we would be in prime position to jump-start the team’s rebuilding process by adding one of the many increasingly tantalizing-looking top prospects likely to be ripe for the plucking in next year’s draft. It’s something everyone who roots for this team made peace with well before the season started, and something that’s made the team’s overachieving start somewhat controversial among its more ardent fans.

Still, a lot of this isn’t the Sixers’ fault–it’s not just that the Sixers haven’t been bad enough, it’s that the rest of the East has been terrrrrrible. Of the 15 teams that make up the Eastern Conference, only the Heat and Pacers are unambigiously good–everyone else is some shade of mediocre or terrible, including such much-hyped teams as the Bulls, Knicks and Nets, who through a combination of injuries and underperformance have gotten off to absolutely disastrous starts to the season. A stunning 12 Eastern teams have losing records, and six of those are worse than that of the Sixers.

But starting tonight, the Sixers can help themselves achieve a little clarity. Over the next 11 days, the team will play six games against teams whose records are all within a game or two of their own–the Magic (twice), Hornets, Pistons, Bobcats and Nuggets. These are, except for maybe the Bobcats and mayyyybe the Magic, all teams we expected would be better than the Sixers this year, and ones we really don’t want to have to worry about taking up our elbow room on the journey to the lottery in May. The Sixers could make things a lot easier on themselves in both directions by piling up the L’s over this stretch.

Conversely, though, if the Sixers actually are good-ish–if this hasn’t all been a fluke, but rather the handiwork of brilliant coaching, a strong team culture and some undervalued player personnel–then now would be the time for them to prove it. None of these teams are considerably better than the Sixers, but none are considerably worse, either. If they take care of business against this middling bunch–going 4-2 or better–we might have to finally admit that the Sixers are actually pretty OK, and not likely to tumble into the East cellar without jettisoning some of their better players first.

Either way, we should have a less murky picture of the Sixers and the NBA at large after this stretch, and considering how confusing this first month of the season has been, we could really use a little fog-clearing. It’s hard to know which direction to root for–obviously the idea of adding a Wiggins, Parkle or Randle (or Exum or Gordon or Smart) next summer remains enticing enough that it’s hard to give up on the original tanking plan, but it has been unspeakably entertaining watching this team play the type of ball they have been for the season’s first four weeks–the good games, anyway. It’d be sad to say goodbye to that.

7:00 against the Magic from Amway Center. The Magic are just a half-game in back of the Sixers, meaning that losing to them tonight would drop Philly one rung further in the standings. Is Philly ready to start sliding? Are we ready for them to do so? Let’s get some answers tonight.

  1. Lol - Nov 27, 2013 at 1:27 PM

    Not a big NBA fan, so I’m asking. Can you really only win championships by drafting a superstar? If so, why aren’t they doing some serious tanking? Why aren’t fans booing when they win and cheering when they lose?

    Reply
    • Andrew - Nov 27, 2013 at 4:55 PM

      Only? No, not only–the ’04 Pistons cut-and-pasted a non-superstar team together and the two most recent Laker semi-dynasties were built more through trade and free agency than the draft (though their trade for Kobe was a draft-night one), But when it comes to winning titles, history certainly favors teams that land to draft a Nowitzki, Pierce, Wade, Duncan or Jordan in the draft, though.

      I think the more salient point here is that you don’t need the #1 pick, or even a top five pick, to necessarily get one of those guys. Nowitzki and Pierce were both taken in the back-end of the top ten in ’98, Kobe fell all the way to #13, and Paul George, the guy who appears to currently be taking the Pacers to a near-championship level, was taken eight spots after Evan Turner in the 2010 draft. Drafting well is much more important than drafting high, though obviously the former makes the latter much easier to accomplish.

      Reply
  2. The Commish - Nov 28, 2013 at 7:52 PM

    6-10 now. Happy Tanks-giving.

    Reply

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