Skip to content

Philly March Madness: (4) Randall Cunningham vs. (13) Shane Victorino

Mar 15, 2011, 2:02 PM EDT

Over the next few weeks at The700Level, we'll be posting poll matchups as part of our Philly March Madness competition. Examine the cases of the two fine Philadelphia athletes below, and cast your vote at the bottom as to which you think should advance to the next round. And as always, feel free to explain your selection and/or debate the choices in the comments section.

RC
(4) Randall Cunningham

Extraordinary. Electrifying. Astonishing. These are just a few words that have been used to describe Randall Cunningham, who was once famously featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated along with the title "Ultimate Weapon." Hard to argue. From 1987 to '94, Randall wasn't just the Eagles' starting quarterback; he was the offense, and occasionally the punter, too. At a time when signal callers were largely stationary in the backfield, Cunningham revolutionized the position with his ability to scramble. All opposing defenses could do was shake their heads in awe when QB Eagles improvised, defying the laws of gravity en route to highlight reel touchdowns. A torn ACL erased the '91 campaign for Cunningham, probably their best shot at winning a championship, and his natural gifts began to diminish thereafter. A broken leg derailed his '93 season as well, and two years later, he was ultimately benched as the team transitioned to a west coast offense. All told, Starship 12 threw for 22,877 yards and 150 touchdowns in his Philadelphia career, while totaling 4,482 yards and 32 scores on the ground… and changing the position forever. -Kulp

SV
(13) Shane Victorino

Certain cliche sports terms get thrown around a lot, but when you're talking about Shane Victorino, "spark plug" fits. Need somebody to start a rally? Shane can ignite the offense, either with a big hit or on the base paths. Need somebody to help the grounds crew unroll the tarp during a severe rainstorm? The Flyin' Hawaiian and all his pals will be right out. It's not hard to see why he's become a fan favorite since being elevated to an everyday player in 2006. Vic plays hard. He runs the bases as if it were Albert Belle packed in that 5'9", 190 lbs. frame. He's a rangey centerfielder who isn't afraid to get his uniform dirty, with three consecutive Gold Gloves to show for it. But Vic also plays with emotion. When he makes those game changing plays, he's chirping or demonstratively clapping his hands. Or both. The other dugout knows he's there though, and so do his teammates. -Kulp